Cooking & Gardening with Indigenous Edibles with 100+ Recipes

It's my new obsession - well, after The Ladies, that is! - and hopefully, my next book. I'm so into the wild things these days. I'm eating the weeds and loving it! I'll share some tips and recipes with you right here....soon...I promise.

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Bacon-Wrapped Roasted Sunchokes with Chevre and a Balsamic-Maple Drizzle

There’s a natural sweetness to sunchokes that makes them the perfect foil for smoky bacon and the tang of soft, un-ripened goat cheese and balsamic vinegar. This dish is super easy but looks like a million bucks at the table. Tastes pretty good, too!

Ingredients:

12 sunchokes, washed and trimmed

6 to 12 slices of bacon, depending on size of ‘chokes

500 mL (2 cups) decent-quality balsamic vinegar

1 cup (250 mL) maple syrup

¼ cup (60 mL) chèvre

Fresh black pepper, optional

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400 ͦF (200 ͦC)

Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper.

Wash and dry sunchokes, trimming off any super-skinny, black, or straggly bits.

Depending on the size of the ‘chokes, you will need ½ to 1 full piece of bacon per. The idea is to cover quite a bit of the ‘choke’s surface area with bacon.

Wrap the ‘chokes in bacon and set on the parchment-lined sheet, seem-side down. Roast for 15 to 20 minutes or until the bacon is browning nicely and going crisp at the edges.

While the ‘chokes are roasting, make the reduction. In a large saucepan or high-sided skillet over medium-high heat, add the vinegar and maple.

Stir often and keep at a gentle boil until it has reduced by half and is syrupy—about 15 minutes.

 

It should thickly coat the back of a spoon, and keep in mind, it will thicken further as it cools. Set aside to cool, then transfer to a jar or small pitcher.

 

If you have left overs of this reduction, keep it in the fridge almost indefinitely and enjoy it on salads, grilled veggies, cheeses, roasted meat, on and on.

To serve, place three ‘chokes on a side plate, drizzle with about 1 tablespoon of the balsamic reduction—more or less to taste—and crumble chèvre over top, again, about 1 tablespoon per. Finish with a grinding of fresh black pepper if you like.

© 2016 by Signe Langford

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